A Lesson from the Otter Side

It seemed like it was time for another video and this looks like a perfect way to spend an afternoon if you ask me.  Watch as the otters drift apart, then find each other once again.  I dare you not to smile.  Then, go hold hands with someone you love.

Staying Connected At All Times

Many people, particularly the younger crowd, have immersed themselves in online social networking. New sites are continually popping up for sharing details about your life and many of the newer sites are allowing you to do so from your mobile phone.

In Social Networking Leaves Confines of the Computer, one creator of the technology explains, ”exhibitionism will exist as long as there is voyeurism, but we are in the business of helping people stay in touch with the people who are close to them.”

Fans of the technology use it to update their friends, family, or complete strangers on their daily lives. Some use it to share their travel experiences, like Walter Zai, who captured his African safari via his mobile phone for instant online sharing.

Services like Twitter provide continual messages from users answering the question, what are you doing right now? At the time I wrote this, problemboard was “feeling raindrops despite no clouds. I hope those are raindrops…,” while anjibee was “wearing my pink eskimo joe’s tee that ronnoc sent me and pink jammie bottoms. might just wear them all day… .” Interesting.

Whatever the venue, social networking is will definitely be around for a while. New technology will continue to tweak the playing field. So, what am I doing right now? Walking away from the computer.

Office Hallways Growing Longer

First technology brought us telecommuting. Now some companies have opted to go virtual. Virtual companies seek the skills they need, at a price they can afford, without worrying about locale. The Internet, email, and other technologies allow individuals to work together from miles apart. In The Long Hallway on A List Apart, Jonathan Follett offers some important advice to anyone considering a virtual company.

His advice is easily transferrable to most businesses. To be successful virtual (or non-virtual) employees should:

  • Understand the importance of a solid process
  • Know how to network
  • Have strong written communication skills
  • Set boundaries on how and when to communicate with other team members
  • Trust in their team members

With the amount of virtual communication in today’s world, it’s good to know that some of the same old rules, not to mention a little common sense, still apply.

Spring Colors Flourish

Spring is finally arriving.  I can tell because my office complex replaced the greenery with daffodils, dandelions fill the median strips of my daily commute, and my neighbor has already mowed his lawn twice this week.

It dawned on me during these commutes that I always hear people talk about Fall colors, but rarely hear the same excitement over Spring colors and I have to wonder why. Maybe we’re too busy cleaning or preparing for summer.  I don’t ever hear anyone say they are going to take a drive to look at the Spring foliage. It’s exciting to see everything wake back up after a long winter’s nap, though. Here are a few other random things I like about Spring:

  • Wildflowers and butterflies
  • Sound of all ages playing outdoors
  • Going to a baseball game
  • Fresh breeze rustling the curtains
  • Flavorful fruits and vegetables to liven up my mediocre cooking

Green Issue Actually Goes Green

Today is Earth Day and to show its eco-friendly side, The Week magazine launched its first ever green issue on Friday. Rather than distributing a printed version, this issue, sponsored by Lexus, will run for one week on The Week’s website. Along with the usual features, special focus has been placed on environmental concerns like global warming and what it means to “go green.”

While many magazines talk about going green, The Week went a step further. What better way to spotlight the environment, than to save a few trees?

Green Issue for Earth Day


Today is Earth Day and to show its eco-friendly side, The Week magazine launched its first ever green issue on Friday. Rather than distributing a printed version, this issue, sponsored by Lexus, will run for one week on The Week’s website. Along with the usual features, special focus has been placed on environmental concerns like global warming and what it means to “go green.”

Don’t be mistaken. The Week has not moved its publication to the web for good. They are still dedicated to their print magazine, but they understand that in this changing world, consumers get their information from a variety of sources. What better way to spotlight the environment, than to save a few trees?

There Wasn’t a Warning Label

We all have those little moments where we re-learn something we already knew. You know, those moments that make you check to see if there were any witnesses. I give you this list of helpful hints. Think of it like those warning labels that tell you not to eat the drying pellets that come in electronic packages- even if you already know not to eat them, it’s still good advice.

1. The car doesn’t start if you haphazardly toss the keys in the passenger seat when you get in.

2. Don’t lean against the water dispenser on a refrigerator.

3. Elevators don’t stop on your floor unless you’ve pressed the button for said floor.

4. A rice cooker will not cook dry rice. You must add water.

5. Your head goes through the neck hole on your shirt, not the arm hole.

6. It is far easier to exit a vehicle if you first unbuckle your seatbelt.

7. You can’t put a CD in a CD-player that is already occupied.

8. A cell phone will not dial a number until you hit the “send” button, hence the silence on the other end.

9. The clothes washer works best when you push the start button.

10. So does the dryer.

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